CuroGPG - Getting started

From April 2017, any organisation that has 250 or more employees must publish and report specific figures about their gender pay gap, such as the difference between the average earnings of men and women, expressed relative to men’s earnings.

In order to calculate the gender pay gap figures, you will need to retrieve specific data about your employees and their pay. The following paragraphs will talk you through what information is required in order to get started, along with suggestions for further reading should you require it.

All information detailed here is in accordance with the government’s official guidelines.

The snapshot date

For statutory reports, your figures must be calculated yearly using a specific reference date. For public sector organisations the official snapshot date is 31st March; and for private sector organisations and charities it is 5th April. You are legally obliged to publish your gender pay gap figures within a year of this date, and ensure the figures are publicly accessible for at least three years.

You are welcome to use the application to run calculations on data captured outside this date, for instance should you wish to monitor the effectiveness of equality measures on a monthly or quarterly basis; though they could not be used as official reports since they do not satisfy the legislation’s legal requirements.

1. Relevant Employees, Full-Pay Relevant Employees And Their Gender

In order to create your reports, you need to record:

  1. All employees employed by your organisation on the snapshot date.

    These are referred to as ‘relevant employees’, and each one needs to be added to a new row of the csv template along with a unique ID number that you assign to them.

  2. Whether each relevant employee was paid their usual full pay during the data period. These are referred to as ‘full-pay relevant employees’.

    If an employee is paid less than their usual basic pay or piecework rate during the relevant pay period for reasons other than leave (for example because they have been on strike), they still count as a full-pay relevant employee.

    If employees are being paid less than their usual basic pay or piecework rate, or nil, during the relevant pay period as a result of being on leave, then they are not a ‘full pay relevant employee’. It does not matter whether the leave is taken during the relevant pay period – what matters is whether the pay is reduced during that relevant pay period due to the leave.

    Employees who receive no pay at all during the relevant pay period, whether or not this is as a result of being on leave, should be excluded from the gender pay gap calculations.

    For all ‘full pay relevant employee’. Enter True under the corresponding column for each employee that satisfies this criteria and False for those that do not.

  3. Whether each relevant employee identifies as male or female.

    Enter either M or F for those that identify as male and female respectively, or NA if the employee does not identify as either of these genders.

Source and for more information: gov.uk

2. Ordinary Pay

You will need to record the amount of ordinary pay received by each employee, which includes basic pay, allowances, pay for piecework, pay for leave and shift premium pay.

Ordinary pay should not include overtime, redundancy pay, pay related to termination of employment, repayments of authorised expenses, benefits in kind or any interest-free loans.

Ordinary pay must be recorded as a gross figure, before tax or any deductions for employee pension contributions; but after any deductions for salary sacrifice.

Ordinary pay can be recorded as either an hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, or yearly amount; though the same frequency must be used for all employees in the report.

CuroGPG will automatically convert your figures to the needed output for the legislation, so it is recommended that you simply add the frequency as its recorded in your payroll. If your payroll consists of multiple frequency types, please convert them to a single type using the specific methodology that the Gender Pay Gap reporting requires:

  • If the pay period is a year, divide the amount by 52.18 to convert it to a weekly frequency

  • If the pay period is a month, divide the amount by 4.35 to convert it to a weekly frequency.

  • If the pay period is a week, divide the amount by 7 to convert it to a daily frequency, or by the employee’s number of weekly working hours to convert it to an hourly frequency.

Source and for more information: gov.uk

3. Bonus Pay

You will need to record the amount of bonus pay received by each relevant employee over the previous 12 months ending on the snapshot date, and must include any profit-sharing, productivity, performance, incentive and commission bonuses. You will also need to record the amount of bonus received by each full-pay relevant employee in your organisation's pay period which includes the snapshot date

Do not include overtime pay, redundancy or any other pay related to termination of employment.

Bonus pay must be recorded as a gross figure, before tax or any deductions.

Bonuses are included in the calculations if they have actually been received within the mentioned period. When bonuses paid are related to a period longer than the pay period, you should use a pro-rata bonus figure for the pay period.

Bonus pay can be recorded as either an hourly, monthly, quarterly, or yearly amount; though the same frequency must be used for all employees in the report.

CuroGPG will automatically convert your figures to the needed output for the legislation, so it is recommended that you simply add the frequency as its recorded in your payroll. If your payroll consists of multiple frequency types, please convert them to a single type using the specific methodology that the Gender Pay Gap reporting requires:

  • If the pay period is a year, divide the amount by 52.18 to convert it to a weekly frequency

  • If the pay period is a month, divide the amount by 4.35 to convert it to a weekly frequency.

  • If the pay period is a week, divide the amount by 7 to convert it to a daily frequency, or by the employee’s number of weekly working hours to convert it to an hourly frequency.

Source and for more information: gov.uk

4. Working Hours

You will also need to record the contractual number of weekly working hours for each employee. These are used to help establish an employees ‘hourly pay’.

Don’t include paid or unpaid overtime in weekly working hours figures.

Where employees do not work the same number of hours each week, calculate an average over an appropriate 12-week period that must end with the last complete week of the relevant pay period and take the total number of hours worked and dividing by 12.

Source and for more information: gov.uk

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